Wednesday, 6 June 2012

Time out in the Shed: a cup of Tea with Sean Marony, our Artist of the Week

We caught up with Sean Marony, our Artist of the Week to find out a bit more about what makes him tick as a photographer....

Shanty town
Sean Marony
1. What first drew you to photography?
I remember finding copies of National Geographic in the school library and seeing those fantastic images from exotic places. The Sunday supplements were beginning to appear then also, in the mid 60s, and the images from Biafra and the war in Vietnam had a powerful effect on me. 


2. What is your favourite photographic memory, and why?
My favourite photographic memory would be my first visit to the  Angkor Wat temple complex in Cambodia in 1999, before it became overrun with tourists. Seeing it for the first time in the early morning light was an unforgettable experience.


Cow Wash
Sean Marony
3. Who is your favourite photographer, and why?
I dont know if I have a favourite photographer, but I have great admiration for war photographers who put themselves in danger for their art - James Nachtwey, Tim Page and Horst Faas spring to mind.


4. What would be your ideal camera, and where would you take it?
My ideal camera would have a 19-500mm lens and be small yet rugged, and I would like to take it on a round the world trip.



Monks Kampot
Sean Marony



5. Tell us what you enjoy most about your own work, and what has inspired you recently.
What I enjoy about my own work is being able to look back at images I had forgotten about and thinking - wow, that is good. Right now I am inspired by nature, and getting into macro photography in a big way.


6. Do you have bursts of creativity - and when/where are you most creative?
Bursts of creativity do happen, but tend to be when I have spare time. 



Boats & Buildings
Sean Marony


7. What are the most important elements of a successful photo?
The most important elements of a photo depend on the type of  image, for example portraiture and landscape are very different disciplines. Lighting and composition are  usually important, but not necessarily. The great thing is that you can use the rules or break them and come up with something interesting either way, but it is important to practice and to develop your eye.

8. Tell us about your favourite photograph, either your own or someone else's, and please send us a copy if you have one!
There are too many images out there to pick one favourite.


Sunset Boats
Sean Marony

To see more of Sean's work, and to buy prints, please visit his Shed Profile

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